Foodscapes: From Seed to Mouth

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Please join me for “Foodscapes: From Seed to Mouth” at UF University Gallery until Friday March 24.

Opening Reception: Thursday March 16, 5:30 -7:30 PM
Artist Talk: Friday March 17, 12-1 PM

This thesis presents gardening, picking food and eating as enjoyable steps towards the reclamation of the food system.

Participants will select and harvest food from the tile based vertical garden with my aid. We will then prepare the items together at the preparation station, talking about the food before us and food in general. Lastly, the participant will choose a plate and sit to dine. These steps are such as to implicate the viewer in a seasonal garden landscape, the labour and bodily engagement of cooking, and a community connection in eating.

Plants, soils and seeds have been dug up from UF Organic Garden Co-OPField and Fork Farm and Gardens ,Swallowtail FarmAlachua County Feed & SeedForage Farm and my home garden.

The Gallery is open:
Tuesday/Wednesday/Friday: 10 AM – 5 PM
Thursday: 10 AM – 7 PM
Saturday: 12 PM – 4 PM

Enjoy!
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MFA Thesis Exhibition: Foodscapes

Foodscapes, Front

Join me for “Foodscapes: From Seed to Mouth” at UF University Gallery March 14-24.

Opening Reception: Thursday March 16, 5:30 -7:30 PM
Artist Talk: Friday March 17, 12-1 PM

This thesis presents gardening, picking food and eating as enjoyable steps towards the reclamation of the food system.

Participants will select and harvest food from the tile based vertical garden with my aid. We will then prepare the items together at the preparation station, talking about the food before us and food in general. Lastly, the participant will choose a plate and sit to dine. These steps are such as to implicate the viewer in a seasonal garden landscape, the labour and bodily engagement of cooking, and a community connection in eating.

Plants, soils and seeds have been dug up from UF Organic Garden Co-OPField and Fork Farm and Gardens ,Swallowtail FarmAlachua County Feed & Seed and my home garden.

Enjoy!

Foodscapes Back

 

Exhibtion: FEAST: RADICAL HOSPITALITY IN CONTEMPORARY ART

I am really excited about this  Chicago exhibition from 2012 Feast: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary Art. 

“Since the 1930s, numerous artists have used the simple act of sharing food and drink to advance aesthetic goals and to foster critical engagement with the culture of their moment.

These artist-orchestrated meals can offer a radical form of hospitality that punctures everyday experience, using the meal as a means to shift perceptions and spark encounters that aren’t always possible in a fast-moving and segmented society.

Feast surveys this practice for the first time, presenting the work of more than thirty artists and artist groups who have transformed the shared meal into a compelling artistic medium. The exhibition examines the history of the artist-orchestrated meal, assessing its roots in early-twentieth century European avant-garde art, its development over the past decades within Western art, and its current global ubiquity.

Through a presentation within the Smart Museum and new commissions in public spaces, the exhibition will introduce new artists and contextualize their work in relation to other influential artists, from the Italian Futurists and Gordon Matta-Clark to Marina Abramović and Rirkrit Tiravanija. Feast addresses the radical hospitality embodied by these artists and the social, commercial, and political structures that surround the experience of eating together.”

Mella Jaarsma, I Eat You Eat Me, 2002, Photographic documentation of a performance in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Courtesy of the artist.

Mella Jaarsma, I Eat You Eat Me, 2002, Photographic documentation of a performance in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Courtesy of the artist.

http://smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/feast/


 

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There is a fabulous blog that with videos and interviews from the exhibition: https://blogs.uchicago.edu/feast/

One feature for today is Enemy Kitchen by Michael Rakowitz.

“The dinner must make a decision and perform their ethics.”

Michael Rakowitz talks about serving dinner on flatware looted from the palace of Saddam Hussein.  Paper replicas of these plates are being used by the Enemy Kitchen food truck, now serving Iraqi cuisine on the streets of Chicago.

 

Exhibition: Domestic Design

HOT CLAY presents in Architecture Gallery at the University of Florida Currents: Domestic Design, juried by Heather Mae Erickson. Join us anytime Monday-Friday 9-5PM in the month of May. We are honored to have the work of 34 artists from the USA and Canada represented.
Please see the  exhibition poster below to share!

Also check out and RSVP the facebook page for links to the fabulous artists and updates: https://www.facebook.com/events/616315608521715/

Currents 2016 Domestic Design Poster

Reseach: Nagle & Ohr

Ron Nagle / George Ohr: Look Closer, Look Again

During May and June the George Adams Gallery will exhibit works by Ron Nagle (SF 1938 -) and George Ohr (1857-1918). The exhibition will consist of approximately ten unique ceramic sculptures by each artist, the Nagles dating from 1970 to 2010 and the Ohrs from the turn of the last century.

The exhibition highlights the work of two ceramic artists working 100 years apart who, despite obvious differences, nonetheless share numerous qualities and outlooks. Ohr’s unglazed, folded “bowls” or blister-glazed “pots” are remarkably similar in their ability to invite close scrutiny and appreciation of their complex surfaces as do Nagle’s contemporary works in porcelain. While Ohr ‘s emphasis is on use while Nagle’s is on making a sculptural object, for both carefully controlled color relationships, sculptural forms, and surface modulations are central to their oeuvres.

Ohr, known as the “Mad Potter of Biloxi,” was active from 1883 when he opened his studio in Biloxi, Mississippi, until 1910. He referred to himself as an “art potter” and specialized in both utilitarian and non-utilitarian ceramics notable for their complex glazes and eccentric forms and surfaces.

Ron Nagle, active beginning in the mid 1960s in Los Angeles and later in the Bay Area (he taught at Mills College until recently), was initially associated with the high luster and pristine surfaces of the LA car culture. His works are rarely utilitarian (he is known to make sake cups from time to time), almost always small scale, and in porcelain that require multiple firings to create subtly textured and glazed surfaces.