Studio: Time Line, Progress

I have been making lines on plates every day, as proposed, for the last three months. I was planing on making the lines directly with overglaze and various oxides out here, using a fixative to secure the glaze and transport them back to Nelson in Sept. to be fired. But, I decided it is best to test firing out before wasting such precious and many materials. Thus, the lines are done in think India Ink. I plan to dedicate a wall in my studio come Sept and install them all as if in a gallery. Then take them one by one and re-line and fire em’ throughout Sept/Oct/Nov. This display will allow me to view and consider the lines and give me a notion of what the gallery environment will do to them. Individually they are interesting and as a whole they are a different animal indeed. It is the contrasts in space and line that give some sort of message. The blue sketch below is out my sketchbook in 2010 when I began to toy with the notion of line representing, time and consequently daily life. The TimeLine project had melded with a co-conspirator Alana Wilson’s embroidery project done in isolation to create a show “The Isolation Project”. We are figuring our the kinks and finalities in isolation as well. Ya for isolation. Yay for collaboration.

 

If you didn’t catch my somewhat esoteric proposal posted earlier it was as follows:

I live in isolation. In the forest. With no electricity. Very little noise. My days are based heavily on routine and yet with in boundaries each day has a pace of its own. A flux of time. I am all about recording. All about data collection. I am interested in line and repetition. What would happen if everyday I reported the rhythm in which the day occurred by representation of space and line? Would the juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the busyness and revelry of time be visually communicated? Time never passes at a uniform pace. Each interval of action is different. When a collection of lines is made the space between the lines, the thickness and uniformity of line all speaks to us visually as a concept of speed and time and pace. I suspect the rhetoric (pace) indicated by space will also evoke an emotional reaction or feeling or inkling.
What of content? What of a three-dimensional stage for this study to take place on and within? This mark making, in representation of pace, is only on the surface. Marks must act in conjunction with something of substance. One can not overlook the importance of the ceramic object itself, void of surface. I have chosen various found side plates to use as a stage for this experiment. Why?
Will the slashing through of existing imagery create side effects untrue to the project? Will controversy be prevalent because of the variations in form and firing temperature? Perhaps. Rather it is my musings that the varied forms and surfaces of pre-owned dishes, will as an ensemble, create more depth and narrative . Elude more to a story of the day, the week, the decade in which the plates were once relevant cared for dishes.  Elude to the original process of their making and the time and reasons for their validity (and now of their re-interpretation). Perhaps the contrast in variety will brush up against issues of objective de-value and impermanence in present day Canadian Culture. Every dish was chosen and scrummaged on a journey across Canada to look objectively at craft in Canada. Thus, this collection of plates represents the blatantly varied nature of Canada. All ceramic dishes yes, but all from different places, different times and representing different things (values, concepts) through varied form and esthetics, just like Canadian citizens and geography. When I come along and collect said side dishes, uniting them and impose my daily life and psyche upon the collection, my time and life and consequently the physical lines are imposed on the plates. A metaphor for the eye-glass each person uses to interpret at all times. It may be rash to say that these plates represent Canada and the individual’s chaotic contribution in our multifaceted culture but, then again it may not be.
Will this experiment cause insight into my day to day? Into how time is in no way stagnant nor constant but rather staggered and complex? Will it give insight into each individual’s perception of time in context of a Canadian past, present and future?
A simple idea, executed simply, yielding complicated (complex) results (effects, outcomes).

One thought on “Studio: Time Line, Progress

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s